Bookmark and Share
 
My Midsummer's Eve 2012 - Food Obsession...
June 24, 2012 3:02 PM

   

So this Friday was Midsummer's Eve here in Sweden, a day which I actually think feels more like Sweden's National Day than the actual Swedish National Day. I say that because the celebration of Sweden's National Day is rather new, compared with the celebration of Midsummer's Eve in Sweden. Anyway, Midsummer's Eve is also a day that, at least for me, revolves a lot around Swedish food. :p

Midsummer Pole
A Swedish Midsummer Pole.

Now I did go to check out a Midsummer Pole on Midsummer's Eve, but unfortunately the games and dances around the pole had already ended when I got there... Probably because the weather was a bit unreliable. Even so, I did take a few photos of it. I also took photos of the rest of my Midsummer Eve highlights of course, which mainly consisted of different foods though. Lol! Actually, I am starting to think I might be a bit food obsessed..? Ehum...

Anyway, below are some photos from my Midsummer's Eve 2012. :-)

Midsummer Pole Sweden
The Midsummer Pole in Rödeby in Sweden. Where most festivities were over when I arrived, but a few children where still playing around the Midsummer Pole though. :-)

Midsummer Lunch
After my visit to the Midsummer Pole it was time for Midsummer lunch. Which consisted of...

Swedish New Potatoes
... boiled Swedish new potatoes with fresh dill.

Egg Halves
Boiled egg halves with mayonnaise, fresh dill, shrimp and crayfish tails.

Sour Cream Chives
A super simple cold sauce made with sour cream and fresh chives.

Midsummer Pickled Herring
Different types of pickled herring, pickles from the left are: onion, French onion and tomato.

Midsummer Matie Herring
And of course the classic, and most popular, pickled herring on the Swedish Midsummer table - Matie Herring.

Now the difference between pickled
Matie herring and "normal" pickled herring is that Matie herring is caught in early autumn, just before the herring becomes mature to mate. This is when the fish has the correct fat content, size and has eaten the type of food which gives it its special Matie herring flavour.

Pickled Onion Herring
My favourite pickled herring though, and pretty much the only pickled herring I eat, is pickled onion herring (in the photo). I think Matie herring tastes a bit too salty and mushy. Pickled onion herring, on the other hand, has a bit more texture and firmness to it and tastes a bit salt and sour - which I like.

Midsummer Lunch Plate
My Midsummer lunch plate. To drink I had a Swedish beer (Mariestad) and a Swedish snaps (
OP Anderson Aquavit). Now the proper and traditional way to drink snaps on Midsummer's Eve is to sing a snapsvisa - booze song before you drink it, but I think it is quite suffice to just say SKÅL - Cheers. ;p

Midsummer Starwberry Cake
In the afternoon it was time for the all important and traditional home made Midsummer Strawberry Cake with fresh Swedish strawberries - which my sister made this year. Yuuuuumm!! :p

Midsummer Starwberry Cake
My piece! :p The Strawberry Cake was made out of sponge cake, without fat, and filled with crushed strawberries and vanilla custard. It was then covered with whipped cream and strawberries. Insanely delicious!!! And very hard to stop eating...

Now the weather was alright on Midsummer's Eve during the day, barely any rain. But of course when we decided light the grill in the evening...

Midsummer Eve Barbecue
... it started to rain quite heavily.

Midsummer Eve Barbecue Food
But thanks to the lid on the grill, we managed to barbecue these treats anyway. On the grill: corn, veggie sausages and two T-bone steaks.

Midsummer Eve Barbecue Plate
My Midsummer barbecue plate. T-bone steak, corn, egg (from lunch), a little bit of bought potato salad and some home made potato salad. Another BIG yum!

Midsummer Eve Dog
Of course during this eat fest my dog Lisen held a close eye under the table, in case anyone were to drop something edible. Diva however, the furry doggy behind Lisen, tried her luck a bit more up close to the action. Hehe. Naturally both doggies got a lot of goodies and treats to eat on this day too! :-)

I told you I think I have become a bit food obsessed... Lol! But really, food is an important part of the Midsummer celebration. Dancing around the Midsummer Pole and wearing Midsummer Crowns are also a big part of course, but more for children and families I think. So, despite the over eating, my Midsummer's Eve was pretty calm this year. Which was kind of nice. Now I just have to work off those insane amount of extra calories I have eaten lately... Yikes! Good thing the next big Swedish food fest is not until August, when the Crayfish Party Season starts. Yihaa! ;p

/A.L


Add comment to this post
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Shrimp and Shrimp Sandwich History In Sweden
March 1, 2012 10:55 AM



Among upper-class people it became popular to eat shrimp in Sweden in the 1500s. Common people however perceived shellfish as insects and unclean to eat back then. Therefore it was not until the 1800s Denmark and Norway began with a more systematic shrimp fishing and not until the 1900s Sweden followed in their footsteps. More specifically shrimp fishing in Sweden started in Kosterfjorden in 1902. Today there are around 200 shrimp boats in Sweden.

Now the origin of the Swedish Shrimp Sandwich can be traced back to Denmark in the 1800s and their special Danish Sandwich called Festsmörrebröd. A Danish Festsmörrebröd was usually made with bread, butter, at least one meat spread, sauce and garnish. It is assumed that the Shrimp Sandwich made its way to Sweden via the regular ferry traffic, which began in 1872, from Denmark to Skåne and Gothenburg. The Shrimp Sandwich then spread throughout Sweden and in the 1950s it started to show up at certain restaurants as a small lunch dish. It is however uncertain when Shrimp Sandwiches started to appear in coffee shops around the country.

Today the Shrimp Sandwich is most associated with air travel and other travel in Sweden. In fact a total of 7000 Shrimp Sandwiches are sold per week at Arlanda Airport in Stockholm and Landvetter Airport in Gothenburg, that means 364 000 sold Shrimp Sandwiches per year. To make all these sandwiches it takes a total of 60 ton of shrimps, 42 ton at Arlanda and 18 ton at Landvetter. In fact, these two airports have on their initiative declared October 14th Shrimp Sandwich Day.

A traditional Shrimp Sandwich consist of bread, butter, shrimp, mayonnaise, egg, a vegetable, a slice of lemon and a sprig of dill. Some versions also include a few slices of red onion. To get the absolute best taste the shrimp should be fresh and newly peeled.

Now I LOVE Shrimp Sandwiches, and most seafood/shellfish, but peeling shrimp is so boring! Therefore when I make Shrimp Sandwiches (like the one in the photo below) I usually use refrigerated already peeled shrimp preserved in a sort of saltwater. I also use bread, mayonnaise, egg, red onion, dill, lumpfish roe and a few splashes of lemon juice.

Swedish Shrimp Sandwich
So the Shrimp Sandwich Version in the photo, that I ate a few days ago, only took a few minutes to make and tasted sooo good!!!

Now I am not sure how common or popular Shrimp Sandwiches are outside of Scandinavia? But I sure do hope everybody get a chance to taste one, because they are indeed yummylicious! :p


Source: Origin Swedish Shrimp Sandwich (Swedish)

/A.L


Add comment to this post
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Celebrating Fat Tuesday With
A Non Traditional Lenten Bun

February 21, 2012 7:26 PM



Today we celebrate Fat Tuesday, also known as Fettisdagen in Swedish. This means that we eat a special pastry called Semla, or Lenten Bun, all across Sweden. Now a traditional Semla is made out of a cake of light wheat bread with a sweet filling of almond paste and cream and is very tasty. However instead of eating a traditional Semla this year I decided to try a different version where the bun was made out of Danish pastry dough and filled with a mixture of cream and almond paste, like in the photo below.

Celebrating Fat Tuesday With A Non Traditional Lenten Bun
So this is how the non traditional Semla I ate this year looked.

This non traditional version was actually very tasty. The Danish pastry dough made the bun very light and fluffy and the cream and almond paste mixture was a great idea on how to change up the traditional simple filling. So all in all it was an excellent version of the Semla and I did indeed enjoy to eat it on this lovely Fat Tuesday.

To see what an original Semla looks like and to find out why we celebrate Fat Tuesday in Sweden feel free to check out my page --> Swedish Fat Tuesday Traditions

Happy Fat Tuesday Everyone! :p

/A.L


Add comment to this post
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Sizzling Swedish Pancakes - Yum!
January 28, 2012 1:10 AM



I actually rarely eat Swedish pancakes, even though I do love them! I think it is because it takes some time to prepare them. But yesterday I had such a craving for some Swedish pancakes that it beat the time it takes to prepare them, so I made a batch. And they turned out great!

Now a lot of people put jam or something sweet on their pancakes, I love to put cheese on mine. Hard cheese or soft shrimp cheese. Although I also love to put strawberry or raspberry jam on there as well, not at the same time though. Mostly I mix it up a bit, a few pancakes with cheese and a few with jam of some sort. And because the pancakes looked so tempting yesterday, I simply could not resist to take some photos of them. :p

Sizzling Swedish Pancakes
Sizzle, sizzle.

Sizzling Swedish Pancakes
Then flip it over.

Sizzling Swedish Pancakes
And if a pancake should happen to fall on the floor - well, that is what this little lady is for. :p

/A.L


Add comment to this post
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Swedish Sandwich Cake
November 15, 2011 5:54 PM



I LOVE Swedish Sandwich Cake, which basically consist of a bunch of layers of sandwich slices with different spreads and fillings. Now there are of course endless ways you can make a Sandwich Cake, but my favourite fillings to have in one are for instance cheese, roast beef and different mayonnaise based seafood salads. I also love when it is garnished with lots of shrimps, roast beef, eggs and veggies.

Swedish Sandwich Cake
A slice of a Swedish Sandwich Cake I had a while back.

Now apparently it was a Swedish fellow named Gunnar Sjödahl who invented this delicious concept. He did so when he worked at Wedemarks Konditori (a café) in Östersund in the 1960s. However it seems that different kinds of Sandwich Cakes began to occur in food events as early as in the 1940s in Sweden. Although it was not until the 1970s that Sandwich Cake became a popular cake to serve at festive occasions such as weddings, confirmations, student and birthday parties, in Sweden.

In fact, Sandwich Cakes are still often served at events like these. Which I think is because they can be completely prepared (or bought) in advance. Also a Sandwich Cake is served cold and can be as big or small as you need it to be. And it is served just like a regular cake, simply sliced and put on a plate. So really all you have to do with a Sandwich Cake at a party is to bring it out when the time is right.

Although I do not think that you have to wait until a festive occasion to eat a Sandwich Cake. Hehe. I eat smaller versions of them every now and then, sometimes just to celebrate that the weekend has arrived. I mean, a Sandwich Cake is way too tasty to just be eaten a couple times of year! :p

Swedish Sandwich Cake
Small Swedish Sandwich Cake. Suitable to eat at any time - all year round. :p

Source: dn.se

/A.L


Add comment to this post
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Simple Swedish Collops
November 10, 2011 6:01 PM



Collops, known as Kalops in Swedish, is one of my favourite Swedish dishes to eat during fall and winter. Mainly because it is such a warm, hearty and fulfilling dish, but also because it is so simple to make. Now Collops is easiest described as a Swedish beef stew. A traditional Swedish Collops consist of; stew beef, onion, water, flour, whole allspice, bay leaves and salt. However in Skåne, a county in Southern Sweden, they also use carrots as an additional ingredient in Collops. This version of Collops is called Skånsk Kalops in Swedish. It is also the version I prefer to make.

Simple Swedish Collops
Another difference between a traditional Swedish Collops and a Skånsk Collops is that the beef in the traditional Collops should consist of pounded collops. Like in the photo above.

Simple Swedish Collops
Whereas in Skånsk Collops thicker pieces of beef are used instead. Like in this photo. However both versions of Collops are usually served with boiled potatoes and pickled beets.

Now this dish was first mentioned in Sweden in Cajsa Wargs 1755 Swedish cookbook "Hjelpreda I Hushållningen För Unga Fruentimber" - "Assistant in Housekeeping for Young Women". Although why this dish was named Collops - Kalops, a name taken from the English language, is unknown. But regardless of how the dish got its name, it sure is a very simple dish to make.

So I will try my best to give an idea of how I usually make Collops. However I must warn you that my spice, water and flour measurements are usually spontaneous, therefore it is a bit hard for me to give exact numbers. But here it is;


Recipe Swedish Collops (Skånsk Kalops)
(4 people)

600 grams of stew beef
2 carrots
1 onion
water, flour, whole allspice, bay leaves and salt

Simple Swedish Collops

1. Cut beef into stew size pieces.

2. Chop onion and carrots. The carrots should be chopped pretty thick.

3. Fry beef and onion in a pot with some butter/oil until beef has gotten some color.

4. Pour a thin layer of flour over the beef and onion, stir.

5. Pour in water so that it just covers the beef .

6. Season with about 1,5-2 teaspoons of salt, 10-15 whole allspice and 5-7 bay leaves. I also put in the carrots in this step, but they can be put in when about 30 minutes remain of the cooking time. It depends on how soft you want the carrots. Or how thick/thin you have chopped them.

7. Let simmer under lid for at least 1,5 hours. I prefer to let it simmer about 2-3 hours.

8. Taste stew a few times while it simmers to check if additional seasoning is needed, or extra water needs to be added.

9. Serve with boiled potatoes and pickled beets.

Enjoy! Or as we say in Swedish when we want to wish each other a good meal - Smaklig Måltid! :-)


Source: catering.nu


/A.L


Add comment to this post
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Swedish twist on a Turkish dish?
September 18, 2011 4:18 PM




Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls, known as Kåldolmar in Swedish, is a popular dish in Swedish households. I grew up eating them both at home and in school. And I actually thought it was an original Swedish dish but it turns out it is more like a Swedish twist on a classic Turkish dish. The difference being that in Sweden we stuff cabbage, instead of vine leaves, with mince and serve the rolls with brown sauce, potatoes and lingon berry jam, instead of yogurt or salad. However, it is not absolutely certain that this dish originates from Turkey either.

But the most common story in Sweden of how Stuffed Cabbage Rolls found its way here is the one where King Charles XII of Sweden brought them over from Bender. It is said that when King Charles XII in the early 1700s stayed in Bender, after the battle of Poltava and war against Russia. Either the king, or one of his soldiers, tasted Stuffed Cabbage Rolls for the first time. The recipe was then brought to Sweden. In fact this story is so deeply rooted in Sweden that every year on November 30th, the date King Charles XII died, Stuffed Cabbage Day is celebrated in Stockholm.

However, according to another theory this dish was brought to Sweden by people sent to Stockholm from the Ottoman Empire to ensure that Swedish loans were repaid. But no one really knows for sure. What is known though is that the very first written recipe for Stuffed Cabbage Rolls in Sweden can be found in Cajsa Wargs 1765 edition of her Swedish cookbook "Hjelpreda I Hushållningen För Unga Fruentimber" - "Assistant in Housekeeping for Young Women".

Now I have never actually made Stuffed Cabbage Rolls from scratch, I think it is a bit too time consuming. I simply buy frozen pre-made Stuffed Cabbage Rolls and then finish cooking them. By doing this I do not have to boil cabbage leaves and stuff them with mince, boiled rice, fried onions, salt and white pepper. The time consuming part...But what I do do is to fry the Stuffed Cabbage Rolls in a frying pan on relatively high heat to get some color on them. Pour syrup over them and add meat stock. After that they just need to simmer under a lid for about 45 minutes before they are done. And I always use the remaining simmering liquid to make the brown sauce with.

Swedish Stuffed Cabbage Rolls
I of course then eat them in the "Swedish Twist" way. With boiled potatoes, brown sauce and lingon berry jam. Very tasty and a perfect dish to eat this chilly time of year in Sweden. :p

Source: faktoider.nu



/A.L


Add comment to this post
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Kalles Caviar - A Swedish classic
August 19, 2011 9:42 PM



Kalles Caviar, or in Swedish - Kalles Kaviar, is the name of a classic Swedish sandwich spread which has been sold in Sweden since 1954. It is a mildly smoked caviar mostly eaten on sandwiches but also with eggs. It mainly consist of sugar salted cod- and pollack roe, salt, potato flakes and tomato puree.

Kalles Caviar egg sandwich
Egg sandwich with Kalles Caviar.

According to Abba, the Swedish company that produces Kalles Caviar, 17 million tubes of Kalles Caviar were sold in Sweden in 2004 (Sweden has a population of about 9 million). In 2005 Swedes ate about 2.6 million kilos of Kalles Caviar, or about 173 million sandwiches with this spread. Some staggering figures considering that the original recipe for Kalles Caviar was sold to Abba in 1954 by a peddler for the sum of 1000 SEK or $157 USD.

At first Abba test sold a few unmarked tubes with the caviar in stores. These quickly became very popular, especially among young people. So on advice from their ad agency Abba decided to put a young boy with a popular Swedish name on the cover of the tube. The boy they chose was the son of Abbas director, Carl. Also known as Kalle. Hence the name "Kalles Kaviar" and the tubes final appearence.

Kalles Kaviar
Today a Kalles Kaviar 300 gram tube cost about 27 SEK or $4,25 USD in Swedish stores.


Source: Kalles.se (This is not a sponored post by the way...)


/A.L


Add comment to this post
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Vacuum cleaner - a Swedish pastry
July 24, 2011 5:59 PM




Besides being called Dammsugare - Vacuum Cleaner this pastry/coffee cake is also known in Sweden as Punschrulle - Punch Roll and Arraksrulle - Arrack Roll. Names it has been given in reference to its appearance and flavor. Although I'm sure it goes by other names as well.


The outside of this pastry is made out of green marzipan which has been dipped in chocolate. Inside is a mix of cookie crumbs, punch liqueur, butter and cocoa powder.

The tale is that confectioners in the olden days used to gather cookie crumbs from the floor ("vacuum") then mix in punch liqueur to cover up the taste of old crumbs. So the name Dammsugare - Vacuum cleaner of course refers to the practice of gathering crumbs to put inside the pastry. Punch/Arrack Roll refers the liqueur taste of the pastry (arrack is an ingredient in punch liqueur).

The origin of this pastry however is a bit unclear because several different confectioners have claimed they invented it or learned how to make it from some unknown confectioner. Which also makes it difficult to pin point a year or country of origin for this pastry. But the Dammsugare - Vacuum Cleaner is widely known as a Swedish pastry and it can be traced back to the early 1900s in Sweden.

Today this pastry is one of Swedens most loved coffe cakes and we eat millions of them every year.


The reason I even wrote this post is because I got treated to these home made Dammsugare - Vacuum Cleaners yesterday at my mums. She had never made them before so they looked a bit, ehum, well home made. Hehe. But they tasted great!!! So Thank You mum! :p

Link to an English recipe of --> Vacuum cleaners/Punch Rolls/Arracks Rolls

Sources: ravi.se, wikipedia


/A.L


Add comment to this post
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
Page 1 2 3
Top of page
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swedish food
Page 1 2 3
My Midsummer's Eve 2012 - Food Obsession...
Shrimp and Shrimp Sandwich History In Sweden
Celebrating Fat Tuesday With A Non Traditional Lenten Bun
Sizzling Swedish Pancakes - Yum!
Swedish Sandwich Cake
Simple Swedish Collops
Swedish twist on a Turkish dish?
Kalles Caviar - A Swedish classic
Vacuum cleaner - a Swedish pastry
 
 
 
 
   
© 2010+ ropcorn.com